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SKETCH GALLERY: Sebastian Soukup

I am highly concentrated when I’m at the drawing table. Drawing and sketching is technical and constructive but at the same time a magical process. It is like a ritual session. A zig zag between drawing and dreaming. Almost like being in a VR world I try to switch on a camera in my mind and it walks me through the not yet existing sets. A trip. 

 

The urge to depict forces me to make decisions: about textures, colours, furnitures, light, and even dressing details. An intense moment.

 

I’m always working on a light box, so I start from rough scribbles and build it up to a more accurate sketch. With tracing paper I can go forth and back and while working in layers I can continuously refine the drawing. A first stopover is a black and white version, and after a backup scan, the colour comes with copic’s and crayons. 

The drawings becoming a language. A visual communication with director, the cinematographer and of course the art department.

When we are start preparing a set the drawings are always displayed in the space. The set decorator’s and dressers get the guidelines for their inspiration from that. So it is an amazingly comprehensive nonverbal language.

Working with Wim Wenders is always a marvelous experience. Drawings are very often our main communication tool. For Palermo Shooting Wim wanted to work with an open script. Only a few scenes from the beginning of the movie were drafted. The rest were not even scene titles. Dreams were mentioned in the script but not specified. I did some sketches for the dreams. I showed it to him. Wim did not say anything, not a single word. But next day when I opened the new draft of the script the dreams were described as I depicted them.